Who made your clothes?

scarf

In February/March 2015, I went with a group on a painting trip to Tamil Nadu in southern India, and I have been reminded of that in the last couple of days.
The pandemic changes everything, in big ways and small. I am involved in setting up and running, with Urban Sketchers London, a Thirty Day Indoor Sketching Challenge – Day One was Thursday 19 March 2020, but you can start it any time. Link to information here.

My sketch above is on today’s theme of ‘work’ and I decided to interpret this broadly as I don’t work, I am retired. I had pulled out a bright cotton scarf to wear yesterday, and it is one I had bought at a small weaving workshop in the Chettinad area of Tamil Nadu. You could watch a weaver at work on a traditional loom – I drew this scene (very badly, but I think she was entertained by my eccentric behaviour).

After the Rana Plaza disaster in Bangladesh in 2013, much was revealed about the poor conditions of work in textile factories globally, and the ‘Who made your clothes?’ campaign started. It struck me that (apart from some family hand knitting) the scarf represents the only occasion I have drawn someone who made my clothes.

My sketch above shows the scarf and the sketchbook.

To the Elephant

to the elephant

Most people’s ideas about the Elephant and Castle area of south London are, I think, that it is modern, and frankly a bit gritty. But did you know it features in William Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night?  Twelfth Night was first performed on 6 January 1601 as part of Queen Elizabeth I’s Christmas celebrations and then had its first public performance at the Middle Temple.

Act III, Scene III:
A street. A conversation between Antonio, a sea Captain, and Sebastian, who has been shipwrecked.
SEBASTIAN:
Do not, then, walk too open.
ANTONIO:
It doth not fit me. Hold, sir, here’s my purse.
In the south suburbs, at the Elephant
Is best to lodge; I will bespeak our diet,
Whiles you beguile the time and feed your knowledge
With viewing of the town; there shall you have me.
SEBASTIAN:
Why I your purse?
ANTONIO:
Haply your eye shall light upon some toy
You have desire to purchase; and your store,
I think is not for idle markets, sir.
SEBASTIAN:
I’ll be your purse-bearer, and leave you for
An hour.
ANTONIO:
To th’Elephant.
SEBASTIAN:
I do remember.

The circumstances under which I was drawing the ‘idle markets’ of Elephant and Castle on Saturday 14 March 2020, were unexpected. Urban Sketchers London had scheduled a sketchcrawl there. Suddenly, London was hit by anxiety about the spread of the coronavirus. We decided to cancel the meet-up with 24 hours’ notice. I was sketching alone at the meeting point in case people had not got the cancellation message – my sketch is above. No-one turned up but me.

Sketchbooks into paintings

fold

I’ve just spent five days at West Dean College in Sussex, on a short course called “Sketchbooks into paintings”, with artist Katie Sollohub as tutor.  In outline, we spent two days developing sketchbook material, including work outside in the West Dean gardens, and then three days developing paintings in the studio.  The emphasis was not simply to develop observational drawings and then make paintings of that scene, but to create images which were also based on memory and sensory experience.  We aimed to find a personal response to the place, and discover ways of creating a visual expression of our experience.

On the first evening, we started with random mark making with ink on a one-page sheet, cut and folded to create a miniature sketchbook – mine is shown above.  Next day, we had guided walks in the gardens, where we could choose to make small sketches.  We were each given a concertina sketchbook in which to work.  These we also filled with random marks in various media including coloured inks.  Below are some of the sketchbooks spread out:

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There were several exercises to draw into these sketchbooks, both out of doors and in the studio.  Here are a selection of spreads from mine:

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We had drawing exercises where we were asked to make quick sketches of line, shape, texture, pattern and sound in the landscape.  There were meditations, including one where we did a series of drawings of memories, with closed eyes.  Here is one of mine:

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My studio paintings were done in acrylics.  The tutor had planned that we should work in acrylic or oil paint, as the course had a big emphasis on altering and developing the work, obliterating sections and painting over them; watercolour is really too transparent to work in this way.  My studio painting, below, is based on the charcoal drawing:

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We did a series of studio exercises to help us develop paintings, using the material we had gathered, and our response to the place.  These were intended to develop a more expressive and innovative response, which was based on more than simple observation.  For the one shown below, we each carried out six quick studies based on one of our paintings, following the directions of the tutor.  For example: simple mark making, using the image but changing the colour, moving or removing one element, working at a different scale, and so on.

six

Here, below, are the other two more finished paintings I did, although I think the bottom one needs further work:

P2

P3

Note added later: I have worked on the painting above, and here is the new version:

West Dean March 2020 three second version

I have so much to think about from this course.  Most of it relates to creating studio paintings rather than working entirely on location, which is what I tend to focus on.  For example:

  • developing works in series in order to explore visual ideas
  • doing very quick studies to help find ways forward with a painting
  • thinking about expression which goes beyond straightforward observation, such as how to use colour, composition, or style of marks and brushstrokes to express emotions and memories.

None of these ideas are new, it is putting them into practice which is harder.  Interesting problems.

 

 

Watercolour and the figure

pose 2

The challenge at my watercolour class this morning was painting the figure.  We had a model and the poses were mostly for five minutes.  I worked in monochrome, painting with a fine rigger brush.  It was a challenge, but useful as a way of practicing the use of the brush to make bold lines and marks.

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Heads and helmets

My drawing

Last Saturday, Urban Sketchers London met at the Wallace Collection.  I chose to draw in the Arms and Armoury Galleries, and drew a series of helmets (above).  I was particularly interested in the helmets which provided full cover for the head, and had a strange and dramatic relationship with the human face.

Continuing the theme of heads and faces, here are two drawings done in the Africa Galleries of the British Museum.  The one on the left is a grave marker from Sudan, and the other a bronze head from Benin.

Heads BM 19 February 2020

Winter sketching

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I drew yesterday from a roof garden at 120 Fenchurch Street in the City of London.  The garden is open to the public and is fairly new; the plants will become more established.  The roof garden is at the fifteenth floor and has spectacular views over London.  My fellow sketchers, Lis and Gafung, tackled the views, whilst I looked more at the structure of the new garden.

120 Fenchurch Street

Painting from photographs

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As this is my first post of 2020, it seems appropriate that the painting above is of a walk I took on New Year’s Day.  It is a view of the Peak District near Bakewell; I was walking with my friend Jill.  I did not bravely sit on the hillside painting despite the January weather.  I painted it a couple of days ago, at home, from a photograph I had taken during the walk.

Actually, I rarely paint from photographs.  I am interested in painting on location, partly because I would rather get out of the house than paint at home.  On the whole I have either taken art classes and trips which take this approach, or making paintings from my own drawings.  In mid-winter, it seems worth trying an alternative approach.

I have started a new watercolour class, at London’s Morley College.  This is week three, and we have been painting landscapes from photographs, although next week we paint still life.  In the first class we were trying different watercolour techniques, such as washes and resists.  Week two, we applied these to a landscape, using a muted palette (French ultramarine, burnt umber, yellow ochre) and a photographic reference.  I think mine was a mountain scene in the USA or Canada.  I feel my painting, below, is less than successful, but it was a beginning.

Week two

I put in some practice at home, and I am more satisfied with the painting at the head of this post, which is based on my own photograph taken in the Peak District:

Peak district

Today, week three of the class, the challenge was to paint a snowy landscape, learning how to reserve the white watercolour paper, again using a muted, winter palette of colours (French ultramarine, burnt umber, Windsor yellow).  Here is the photographic reference (I have no idea of the location) and my two paintings:

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An update: the painting at the head of this post, of a walk I took on New Year’s Day, has now found a home with my friend Jill, who took the walk with me:

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Winter landscape – some experiments

Here are some more images from my recent short course at West Dean College in West Sussex.  We did quite a bit of experiment with ink, using various tools, and with graphite.  Some of this was on the theme of ‘winter landscape’, taking a rather abstract rather than observational approach.  Here are some of the experiments I did.img354 (3)

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